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Sub 20-Minute 5-K


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Author Topic:   Sub 20-Minute 5-K
fairlyslow
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posted Dec-11-2005 10:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fairlyslow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Success!!

I ran 18:57 yesterday after being stuck at 20-21 minutes for quite a while. Unless they measured the course wrong...

Patience people, it is possible!

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KudzuRunner
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posted Dec-11-2005 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KudzuRunner   Click Here to Email KudzuRunner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm happy to report that I set a half marathon PR yesterday, one month after notching that 19:55 5K.

My time was 1:31:56 (7:01 pace), which is about three seconds a mile faster than last November's 1:32:33. God we work hard for such small achievements! But I'll take it, and let it stick with me through the winter. Last year's PR was as a 46-year old. I'm 47 now, and hoping there's even more in the coming year.

I was as well trained and perfectly tapered as I know how to achieve, and I got lucky: temps in the mid-30s, calm, gently rolling hills on an o/b course. I ran every mile between 7:06 and 6:53 pace. At about 8.5 miles I was joined by a 20-year old who came blowing up behind me and worked with me until 11, when I surged, let him catch me, and then slowly pulled away. Last 1.1 miles @6:33 pace.

Interestingly, this is almost exactly the time McMillan's calculator says I should have been good for, given the 19:55.

I averaged 50 mpw in July and 40-45 in Aug/Sept/Oct. I've averaged slightly less than that over the past 4 weeks.

I am now a confirmed believer in multipace training. The fact that I'd recently raced 5K @ 6:25 pace gave me the familiarity with various pain-zones that I needed to know how hard I could push in the gritty final stages of yesterday's race. Pacing in half-marathons, it seems to me, is a matter of holding "half marathon pace" until 10 miles or so, then slowly cranking it down into 10K pace, letting your breathing pattern modulate a bit faster if need be, and then cranking it down over that final mile or so into something closer to 5K pace. In other words, it's OK and even advisable to exceed threshold towards the latter stages of a well-paced half marathon--making it into a sort of progression run--but it's risky to push that hard early on.

This is just my theory. I'm happy to have raced well at both 3.1 and 13.1 over the past month, in any case. I like the challenges of both distances.

Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah, and etc. to all

[This message has been edited by KudzuRunner (edited Dec-11-2005).]

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duckgeek
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posted Dec-11-2005 07:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for duckgeek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Congrats to fairlyslow and Kudzu. Nice races!

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JasonsDrivingForce
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posted Dec-11-2005 11:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JasonsDrivingForce     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well I didn't have it in me today. My PR still sits at 20:52 pushing the stroller. I thought I had a chance at it today. Boy was I wrong! I made the mistake of not scouting the course first. I had a great first mile at 6:15 and I was only about 100 yards back of the 3 Kenyans that were leading the race. I hit the first hill and I slowed considerably like I always do on the steep hills with the stroller. However, only a handful of people caught me at that point. Then right around 1.5 miles I turned the corner to see what has got to be the stupidest incline I have ever seen. The course was in Chapel Hill North Carolina. They call it Chapel HILL for a reason. I can’t really describe how steep this thing was but I do know that there is a 100 foot difference between the lowest and highest point on the course and I think most of that occurs in about 300 horizontal feet. Basically I got about half way up the hill and then my legs just gave out. Pushing the 60 Lb stroller up that thing was torture. Not to mention that there was a 15 MPH wind also. I had to walk for about 10 paces for the first time in over 30 races! However, I eventually made it to the top and surprisingly I got my form back fairly quickly. I was able to get my stride back on the down hills and I actually passed several of the people who had passed me. When it came to the final climb though I pretty much had nothing left. My legs were cramping because that big hill was so steep. In the end I finished up with 23:20 for the 5K. That seems like a pretty slow time but you really can’t understand how tough this course was. So the real question is”Would you be more proud of just finishing a TOUGH course or of actually getting the sub 20 on a flat easy course”? Personally I think that today’s run was a big accomplishment. I know that I could do the sub 20 on a fast course but I actually think it is harder to break 23 or 22 on this course with a stroller. What do you guys think? Have you ever run on a course with a mountain in the middle of it?

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Jim24315
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posted Dec-11-2005 11:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim24315   Click Here to Email Jim24315     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KudzuRunner:
I'm happy to report that I set a half marathon PR yesterday, one month after notching that 19:55 5K.

I am now a confirmed believer in multipace training. The fact that I'd recently raced 5K @ 6:25 pace gave me the familiarity with various pain-zones that I needed to know how hard I could push in the gritty final stages of yesterday's race.

[This message has been edited by KudzuRunner (edited Dec-11-2005).]


I'm with you on this one. I had the exact same experience. My 2 best races of the year were half marathons off slightly less mileage than you peaked at. In the 5 months leading up to them, the only road races I had were 5k's--8 total. Providing you have adequate mileage and do some long runs, the move up to the half-marathon is no problem. You have to run so much harder to post a decent 5k time that half-marathon pace feels easy by comparison. This is exactly why I ran them as I was building a mileage base and pointing to the half later in the year.

Not only is the 5k a nice distance to focus on, it is also great preparation for tackling longer distances. I harp on this all the time. So many newer runners want to jump right into the longer races. If they would do some serious 5k training first I believe they would become much better runners.


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SaintCroixRunner
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posted Dec-12-2005 10:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SaintCroixRunner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My 5-K attempt was postponed after I found out my triathlon leg was actually 10-K.
I ran 43:xx for the 10-K, an exact time wasn't possible because my time contained the transition for the bike.
The course was also long by everyone's measure, maybe as much as .2.
So, it looks like February or March will be my next attempt.

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portlander
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posted Dec-14-2005 09:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for portlander     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In the spirit of making this one big sub-20 thread, I'll add my post here:

I ran a 5K this weekend in a very disappointing 21:03. But I think the course was at least .1 miles long. I was less than :30 behind the first female (who had a sub-19 in November). Another guy ran sub-20 last year and finished in 22:40. The perils of running a non-certified course...

Well, I'm going into a base period. I'm going to follow the maffetone approach and keep everything at a low HR. So far, so good. I feel very strong, and don't think I'll have any problem getting over 40 miles per week. I'm going to give it up to 12 weeks as long as I see improvement.

Good luck to everyone with this goal.

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jordan23
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posted Dec-14-2005 09:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jordan23   Click Here to Email jordan23     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi,

Just reading through this thread and thought it was a great topic.

One of the earliest postings mentioned running 7 days a week and that a 2 mile run is better than taking a day off. I completely disagree. Any easy run less than 5 miles I feel is junk mileage and doesn't hit any of the systems that you are trying to improve. At least that's what I have learned from some elite coaches and my own personal experience being a sub 15min 5k guy.

Anyways happy trails and good luck!!

Michael

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Jim24315
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posted Dec-14-2005 09:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim24315   Click Here to Email Jim24315     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jordan23:
Hi,

Just reading through this thread and thought it was a great topic.

One of the earliest postings mentioned running 7 days a week and that a 2 mile run is better than taking a day off. I completely disagree. Any easy run less than 5 miles I feel is junk mileage and doesn't hit any of the systems that you are trying to improve. At least that's what I have learned from some elite coaches and my own personal experience being a sub 15min 5k guy.

Anyways happy trails and good luck!!

Michael


Congratulations on being a sub 15min 5k guy. Sorry, though, that it doesn't make you an authority on this subject. If this were true, someone running 4-miles per day, 7-days per week, would be no fitter than someone who didn't run at all. Give me a break. You could probably run 17's or 18's (at least) off that mileage, but you couldn't beat me if you didn't run at all. Those 3's and 4's add up and are a lot better than doing nothing. I've had some conversations with someone who coaches elite runners too, and he doesn't subsribe to the junk mileage theory.

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MaineRunner2001
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posted Dec-15-2005 09:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MaineRunner2001     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

I'm going to change my training this winter: build up to seven days a week: 4 miles Monday to Saturday, and then 6 miles Sunday. Perhaps I might sneak a six miler in some other day of week.

Here are my thoughts:

1) I've spent a couple years running 10 to 12 (sun), 6 (tue), 8 (thur), and 6 (sat) - a change might help.
2) Family and work life also may find the change helpful/pleasant.
3) I'm coming off a few months of little exercise due to a non-running related health issue. This plan seems more "doable" to me than building up mileage with longer runs.

I don't have any races planned until next summer so it will be a while before my next 5K.

For me most of the fun is getting there. Good luck everyone.

20:04

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batfish
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posted Dec-16-2005 07:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for batfish     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Had my first run in a week this evening. I've been off, resting a case of patellar tendonitis. I went to the docs yesterday, and he said it was ok to run on, as long as it isn't getting worse.

So, did a little 4.24 mile test drive on the local roads. The roads were unfortuneately a little slick, so traction was iffy, but running slow allowed me to keep the gait under control.

I felt fine during the run. After I finished, I knelt in the snow for 10 minutes to cool down the tendons! Feel great, 1/2 hour post-run...

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batfish
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posted Dec-17-2005 09:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for batfish     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was an interesting week for me... I had to deal with my first ever 'overuse' injury. I gave myself a case of patellar tendonitis by running way too far for my fitness on wintry trails with poor footing. I took a week off, and came back Friday night.

Saturday's run was actually pretty good; I felt strong - one of those runs where it feels like you're running 'easily' and yet the pace is actually quite a bit faster than 'normal' easy pace. I was pleased with that.

I've followed up each run with 600mg of ibuprofen and an ice pack.

It seems that I've managed to knock-back the tendonitis. I'm free of any pain before, during, or after running. The only remaining symptom is the 'movie theatre' symptom - a dull (but sometimes surprisingly strong) ache that comes on when the leg has spent too much time bent, in the same position.

I had a doctor's visit on Thursday and he acted as though I were being a bit hypochondriacal, and agreed that a cut-back to reasonable mileage, icing, and ibu and a slow ascent back to my mileage goal, would be ok. So, that's what I'm doing.

Given that I'm forced onto paved roads (from nice, cushy trails) due to weather, I'm lowering my peak mileage goal for the winter. I'm thinking I'll build to 40 and hold and concentrate more on my diet and weight loss. Losing 20 pounds would be the best speedwork I could do, right now.

Maybe I'll build bit higher after the thaw, maybe not. We'll have to see where I am at that point.

Congratulations to those who've already come and gone, having met the sub-20 goal, already - we hardly knew ya!

My week:

FRI: 4.24 miles - 40:49 (9:37/mile) (cautious test drive)
SAT: 5.36 miles - 41:48 (7:47/mile) (little progression from 8:1X to 7:0X)

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[This message has been edited by batfish (edited Dec-17-2005).]

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jordan23
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posted Dec-18-2005 12:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jordan23   Click Here to Email jordan23     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Congratulations on being a sub 15min 5k guy. Sorry, though, that it doesn't make you an authority on this subject. If this were true, someone running 4-miles per day, 7-days per week, would be no fitter than someone who didn't run at all. Give me a break. You could probably run 17's or 18's (at least) off that mileage, but you couldn't beat me if you didn't run at all. Those 3's and 4's add up and are a lot better than doing nothing. I've had some conversations with someone who coaches elite runners too, and he doesn't subsribe to the junk mileage theory.

Jim, I have never had coach prescribe an easy 3 miles unless its the day before a big race. My point was that if your running 5-6 days a week you will get more benefit from the rest than running the 3-4 miles.

Obviously someone running 7days x 4 miles/day will be fitter than someone who doesn't run... never did I state that. But I think almost every coach will call 4 miles at a light pace "junk" for an experienced runner. It doesn't really serve any purpose.

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Jim24315
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posted Dec-18-2005 03:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim24315   Click Here to Email Jim24315     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jordan23:
Congratulations on being a sub 15min 5k guy. Sorry, though, that it doesn't make you an authority on this subject. If this were true, someone running 4-miles per day, 7-days per week, would be no fitter than someone who didn't run at all. Give me a break. You could probably run 17's or 18's (at least) off that mileage, but you couldn't beat me if you didn't run at all. Those 3's and 4's add up and are a lot better than doing nothing. I've had some conversations with someone who coaches elite runners too, and he doesn't subsribe to the junk mileage theory.

Jim, I have never had coach prescribe an easy 3 miles unless its the day before a big race. My point was that if your running 5-6 days a week you will get more benefit from the rest than running the 3-4 miles.

Obviously someone running 7days x 4 miles/day will be fitter than someone who doesn't run... never did I state that. But I think almost every coach will call 4 miles at a light pace "junk" for an experienced runner. It doesn't really serve any purpose.


For someone like you who probably runs a minimum of 70mpw and possibly a 100 or more, an easy 4 miler probably does very little. However, for someone like me and most of the othe posters on this thread it is probably a lot better than doing nothing. I know that the old Lydiard schedules have many days where he prescribes runs of 1/2 hour. Lydiard wasn't a bad coach. It takes me at least a half hour to cover 4 miles on one of my easy days. An elite runner is probably going to cover somewhere in the neighborhood of 5 miles in that time. I think that's the difference.

Anyway, I feel a lot better about running an easy 4 rather than taking the day off completely. I have no way to prove if I would have done just as well by taking all those days off that I ran a short one instead, but at the very least they have helped psychologically.

Good luck with your running,

Jim


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KudzuRunner
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posted Dec-19-2005 12:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for KudzuRunner   Click Here to Email KudzuRunner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, my sub-15 5K days are long gone. So are my sub-17:27 days. (That was my PR, at age 26, back in 1884).

I'm happy to report, though, that I set my own master's 5K PR of 19:41 on Saturday.

It was perfect conditions: 40 degrees, a slight breeze, a rectangle around Audubon Park in Memphis. The Memphis Runners Track Club presiding. I spoke afterwards with the guys taking times. A certified course. Therefore a time that will cheer me through the winter.

Splits: 6:21, 6:33, 6:11--the final half mile down a long gentle stretch that let me open wide. The last .11 at 5:38 pace, around a 90 degree turn to the finish. The WAVA age grading tables tell me my time is 72% of world record time at my age (47); an equivalent time in my prime would have been 18:00 flat.

My previous masters PR was 19:55. I'll take 14 legit seconds. I've always said I wanted to get back to my age-equivalent time.

The winner of the race, by the way, was 48. His time was 17:05.

Gives me something to shoot for.

Truth is, I was fully tapered, coming off a half marathon PR seven days earlier, and am delighted to have done this. 19:41 felt fast as hell, frankly. When I first started on the comeback trail, I was happy to run 22:00. THAT felt fast. But 19:41 felt...really fast. And of course it isn't. But neither is 15:00, to a guy hoping to run, say, 13:21 and qualify for the US olympic team.

We're all part of a continuum. We all like to exceed our prior bests. And differentiate ourselves with reference to the REALLY fast people--anybody who runs faster than us--and the wimps--people who run only as fast as we used to when we were slower. Since I once ran 17:27, I secretly feel as good as or better than anybody who "only" runs 17:28 or slower. That's ego talking. It means nothing. It's how the ego works.

But it's also how we measure our progress, and assess our identities, in this running thing.

When I first started on the comeback trail, exactly three years ago, I amazed myself simply by jogging. I discovered a cool little park here in Oxford, MS. I was still smoking at that point, several years after my heart attack. But I discovered this park, and started jogging, and said "Thank you, God." I said, "I can do this." Because I decided then and there that runnning would be my path back into the light.

Three years later: it still is.

We're all on some sort of path. It's great to win, but (pace Vince Lombardi) winning isn't everything. Staying on the path, living the life you were given, making sure you've worked it well before you go: that's everything. Fast times: they're great. But who's to say what qualifies as a fast time?

Maybe I'll start the 19:30 5K thread next year. Or the 19:00 5K thread.

Most of us here can look back at the 20:30 5K thread--a thread that exists only as an unexploited possibility, but one looked at longingly by the folks who currently (or potentially) contribute to the sub 21:30 thread--and think: job well done.

Merry Christmas, all. Happy runs.

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OldXCguy
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posted Dec-19-2005 07:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for OldXCguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
KudzuRunner,
Congratulations! We all know what a satisfying feeling it is to achieve a long-term goal. Merry Christmas to you too.

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Jim24315
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posted Dec-19-2005 08:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim24315   Click Here to Email Jim24315     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nice run Kudzu and great finish,

I'm almost sure that your times are going to be coming down some more. This was only a week after your marathon.

Congratulations!

Jim

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lamerunner
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posted Dec-19-2005 01:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lamerunner   Click Here to Email lamerunner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Where does one find the "age equivalent time" information??

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Jim24315
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posted Dec-19-2005 01:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim24315   Click Here to Email Jim24315     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by lamerunner:
Where does one find the "age equivalent time" information??

Here's one:

http://www.pinebeltpacers.org/AgeGrade/newwava.html

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KudzuRunner
Cool Runner
posted Dec-19-2005 01:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KudzuRunner   Click Here to Email KudzuRunner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's called the WAVA calculator:

http://www.howardgrubb.co.uk/athletics/wavalookup.html]http://www.howardgrubb.co.uk/athletics/wavalookup.html

If you've had an earlier life as a competitive runner, remember your PRs from those days of old, and are on the comeback trail, these calculators give you a nifty way of making sense of your progress. If my 19:41 at age 47 is equivalent to an 18:00 run by somebody at age 25, and if my PR back then was only 30 seconds faster than 18:00--well, that tells me I'm doing quite well. If I manage eventually to run, say, 19:00, I'm actually beginning to surpass my old times, considered as a % of the world record at each age.

Another way of thinking about such things is in terms of percentage of world record at your age that your times represent. My 19:41 is 72% of the WR. My old PRs (as a younger man) clustered around 75%. A quite reasonable ambition, at my age--apart from kicking butt in my local AG, of course--is simply to create the same cluster at 75% of WR, only with correspondingly slower times. The WAVA age-grading calculator makes all this easy. (The assessment, I mean. Not the running!)

I would say that my surpassing ambition at this point, in fact, would be to break 19:00 in the 5K. I'm in a race with time and my own relative lack of talent; I'm truly not sure I have it in me. But since my legs did indeed take me quite a bit faster than that many years ago, I'm unwilling to rule it out altogether. It makes a good best-case-scenario goal.

What's become obvious to me is that lowering 5K times require that you spend some time working the vein of paces between current 5K pace and current 5K pace minus 30-40 seconds, which is to say between 5K pace and one-mile pace. All that headroom is required in order to feel relaxed not merely at current 5K pace, but as aspirational 5K pace and at whatever maximal pace you're likely to hit in the act of lowering your 5K. If your current 5K pace is 6:30, for example, and you hope to lower that to 6:20 (a 19:41), you certainly need to spend some time running goal pace (6:20), but you've also got to push faster than that in training, so that goal pace isn't right on your stride-comfort redline.

That's why good coaches stress the importance not just of VO2max intervals (which you run somewhere between 3K and 5K pace, which is to say between current 5K pace and slightly faster than goal 5K pace), but of so-called "repetition" or "running economy" intervals at paces faster than that. I've tended to leave these out of the mix, but in the three weeks before I set my PR, I deliberately put them back in, by way of some unmeasured road intervals of 60-90 seconds at what my Garmin "lap pace" told me was 5:50 - 6:15 pace. I did about 6 of those one day, towards the end of a run, on suburban streets, going strictly by feel. I didn't accumulate a lot of lactic acid; each interval was between .15 and .2 miles. I was running 300s to 400s, basically. I wasn't being scientific. What I wanted to make sure of was simply that--well, that the car didn't shudder and shimmy and send pieces flying when I hit the gas hard. And that paid off in this past Saturday's race. 6:10 pace in that final mile wasn't easy--I was holding a fair bit of lactic acid towards the end--but my stride at that pace was quite smooth. Whereas several months ago, when I started speed training, I felt rickety at 6:45 pace. I pulled things together by running 1) a couple of tempo runs at 7:00 pace; 2) some repeat miles at 6:30, which was between 5K and 10K pace; and 3) those fast repeats. I did no hard anaerobic tolerance work.

Have a nice winter, all. I'm all easy miles for a while......

[This message has been edited by KudzuRunner (edited Dec-19-2005).]

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cjk
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posted Dec-21-2005 12:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cjk   Click Here to Email cjk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No one asked me but it is my contention that everyone posting their thoughts on time, distances and goals should include their AGE-WEIGHT and HEIGHT and GENDER in order to receive some legitimate input on how to train.

Giving advice to a sub master is different from all the various age groups.

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Serious Runner
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posted Dec-22-2005 10:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Serious Runner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cjk:
No one asked me but it is my contention that everyone posting their thoughts on time, distances and goals should include their AGE-WEIGHT and HEIGHT and GENDER in order to receive some legitimate input on how to train.

Giving advice to a sub master is different from all the various age groups.


Age might be more of a factor, but I'm beginning to doubt it. I worked with a 40+ lady who wanted to break 20 minutes for the 5K. She ran about 50 miles per week, did the speed stuff, and accomplished her goal. Now she's up to about 90 mpw w/ a couple of speed sessions, and she's really cranking out some times in her 40s.

One of the big factors that I use with the people I work with is time. How much time can/are you willing to invest in this evdeavor? If someone wants to run 20 mpw, they are going to have to train differently from someone who runs 80 mpw. The idea is to figure out how to make the most of the miles that someone is willing to, or can, train.

As for me, I am already under 20 minutes, but I've been reading this thread because a lot of you have good information to share. I have a college PR under 15-minutes, but I'll be the first to tell you that I don't know everything. There's a lot you can get away with when you're young and stupid that will bury you when you hit your 30s and 40s.

I'm working at getting back to 18-flat and then trying to get back to where I used to be. I know that losing about 20 lbs will help.

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Jim24315
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posted Dec-22-2005 11:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jim24315   Click Here to Email Jim24315     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Serious Runner:
Age might be more of a factor, but I'm beginning to doubt it...

I worked with a 40+ lady who wanted to break 20 minutes for the 5K. She ran about 50 miles per week, did the speed stuff, and accomplished her goal.
.


Top 10 Age 60-64(male) last year's Carlsbad 5000

LastName FirstName Age Time
Phillips Herb 64 18:11
Boughter James S 61 18:18
Ingram Larry C 60 18:22
Caro Benjamin 60 18:27
Murra Daniel 60 18:45
Taliaferro Robin 60 19:06
Cabeza Juan 61 19:13
Oliver Joe 63 19:49
Lemire Tom J 61 19:57
Geddes Bruce 60 20:11


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batfish
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posted Dec-25-2005 02:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for batfish     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There's a local Guy, name Jerry Rosa, who runs about an 18:XX 5K at age 62. Not too bad.

Slow week due to Christmas/Work related business...

I'm over the knee tendonitis and have made a successful transfer to road based routes. I hope I don't break down, running exclusively on the pavements for the next several months...

I had a good (Merry Christmas!) long run, today, and think I'll be up back near 40mpw this week, and will hopefully be able to hold it there until spring.

I'm running a noticably faster pace on the roads than I did on the trail, which is to be expected, I guess... I hope I'm not running too fast; all the talk about HR zones, junk miles, etc. has me paranoid about running too hard, if you can believe it. I'm pretty much running whatever pace feels good for that day - not really pushing, but not really wogging, either.

Week of Sunday, December 18, 2005

SUN:
10.31 miles
1:27:38 (8:29/mile) Weight: 173.50
9:16, 8:39, 8:28, 8:29, 8:46, 8:50, 8:36, 8:25, 8:15, 7:41, 2:08


THU:
7.04 miles
58:05 (8:15/mile) Weight: 173
8:42, 7:58, 8:23, 8:27, 8:24, 8:05, 7:48

FRI:
4.20 miles
33:17 (7:55/mile) Weight: 172
7:54, 8:14, 7:53, 7:41, 1:30

WEEK:
21.6 miles
Time: 2h 59m 00s
Avg. Pace: 8:18/mile

------------------
Batfish

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Running Log
The Newbie Wiki

[This message has been edited by batfish (edited Dec-25-2005).]

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mbannon
Cool Runner
posted Dec-27-2005 04:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mbannon   Click Here to Email mbannon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
wogging?

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