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heat training


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leon2
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 02:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for leon2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not only will it help us to race better, but it will help us to train better.

One of the observations I made watching last year's Olympic marathon races for both the men and the women was the respectable times, considering the hot and humid conditions.

There's no doubt that there are benefits to effective heat training. And fortunately most of the methods are the kinds of things we can do on our daily training runs. I was able to learn a couple of things that Deena did. Here's an excerpt from the article ...


    Kastor is preparing for a hot, humid race. Average conditions for August in Athens are 91 degrees with 47 percent humidity, with 100-degree temperatures common. The women's marathon begins at 6 p.m., ... She's done what she could to prepare, running later in the day at times, or running while wearing more clothing.

According to Benji Durden ...


    "All my runs (including the repeats but not the races) were in at least one set of sweats (I went so far as 2 sets of sweats sandwiched with 3 rainsuits were PO2 tanks). ... Heat training can also be considered strength training since you are hauling all those heavey wet sweats around as you run. (;-)

    Additionally you can look at haet training as a way to get altitude effects at sea level. The oxygen uptake system is effected by the partial pressure (i.e altitude) and temperature. The lower the partial pressure or the higher the temperature, the less oxygen the cardivascular system carries. By adapting to the stress of higher body temperature, the body becomes more effective at oxygen uptake in a manner similar to the adaptation to altitude." (how Benji trained)

On my training run today I wore a tshirt, a nylon vest, nylon pants, and a cap. The temperature was in the low 80s. In the near future I'll start a heat training program that partly involves using the sauna ... and lots of fluids, of course.

What methods do you use, or know of, that you can share with us?


---------------------------
Some remarkable achievements in the heat ...

- Carlos Lopes, 2:09:21, 1984 Olympic marathon (still an Olympic record)
- Catherine Ndereba, 2:24:27, 2004 Boston marathon
- Paula Radcliffe, 30:21, 2003 Worlds Best 10K, Puerto Rico
- Lori Bowden, 2:59:16 marathon (after swimming 2.4 miles and cycling 112 miles) at the 1999 Ironman Triathlon in Kona, Hawaii.
- Pam Reed, 2-time winner (overall) of the Badwater Ultramarathon

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maryt
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 06:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for maryt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you are going to race in the heat, you need to train in the heat, but if you're not going to be racing in the heat, I don't see any benefit to running in the heat if you can avoid it. I don't buy that bit about increasing oxygen uptake in a manner similar to altitude - I'd sure like to see more info on that than a post on Let's Run for proof, and it doesn't look like many in the Let's Run crowd bought it, either. You would be much better of running early in the morning or in the evening - the coolest parts of the day you can so you can run faster for longer. Wearing nylon sweat pants that won't let sweat evaporate when the temp is above 80 sounds like a recipe for heatstroke, rather than good training, leon2. Be careful. I wonder if the athletes like Deena are still training wearing extra clothing to simulate heat just for the training effect with no particulaly hot races in the near future. Somehow, I doubt it.

However, if you are going to race in the heat, it's the same prinicples as practicing for any race - try to train under race conditions. We have quite a few hot races in the summer, and we found that we always did better early in the summer season than our usual rivals because we train in the late afternoon. Races are usually 9-10am or in the early evening, so the race temps are much hotter than those you find in the early am and we were more heat acclimitized than those who run in the early morning and were'nt used to the heat of midmorning or early evening. So, although our summer race times were slower, they weren't as much slower as those who hadn't been running in the heat.

My hints for adjusting training to the heat: saltier, shadier, slower, and shorter.
You need to keep hydrated, that goes without saying (plus it doesn't begin with "s" so it didn't fit the effect I was looking for ), but you also need to keep your electolytes up, so drink something that has salt in it and don't avoid the salt shaker.

While training in the heat will help you race in the heat, I don't see any benefits to getting sunburned. In the late afternoon the sun isn't nearly so high, so you still get the benefits of training in the heat for acclimitization, without the extra UV. When we did train in the middle of the day, we tried to find the shadiest area we could.

Slower unfortunately comes with the heat for long distances for sure.

However, you can still keep up speed if you keep it shorter. We sometimes switch from 800s to 400s or even 200s for track workouts. Same speed so your legs still get that practice, but for shorter distances so you don't overheat.

Hint for race day - stay inside where's it's air conditioned for as long as possible. That's not the day to practice running in the heat. I saw that advice a few years ago, but with the wearing of ice vests by Olympic athletes, looks like it's still considered a good thing. Starting out from as cool as possible seems to be beneficial - rather than being out in the heat or warming up much first. The longer you can keep your temperature from getting elevated the better.

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leon2
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 08:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for leon2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:

Wearing nylon sweat pants that won't let sweat evaporate when the temp is above 80 sounds like a recipe for heatstroke, ...

These are not sweat pants. They're actually lightweight, breathable, nylon wind pants (with no liner) that I have worn for many years (not necessarily for the purpose of heat training). They are very comfortable. Colorado Springs does not get very humid. I have been running and racing (including marathons) in the heat for more than 30 years, and have learned how to do it safely.

Here is something Bill Rodgers wrote about the effects of heat training ...


    "Your body is an adaptive mechanism; if you create a stress at the correct intensity the body will respond and get stronger. By piling on layers (this will be different for different people) the body actually does get hotter, even to the point of "over-heating." This over-heating creates a stress which, if not taken too far, will make the body more heat resistant."

Here is a very good thread on Heat Acclimation. From that thread ...


    'in competition in the heat, the heat-acclimatized athlete will always have an 'edge' over an equally fit, but unacclimatized opponent" (Noakes, Lore of Running, p. 110)

    From Lore of Running: p 366 (concerning Ron Daws "Track Suit Technique") Noakes writes:

    "Acclimatize yourself to the heat if the race is to be run in the heat"

    Some degree of heat acclimatization can be achieved quite rapidly. Five to eight exercise sessions, each up to 2 hours, on consecutive days in the heat produce acclimatization that lasts for several weeks. However, it seems that there are quite large differences in the length of time different marathon runners believe they require for acclimatization (Browne, 1986). Some feel that acclimatization can be achieved in days; others believe that even 6 months is too little (Browne, 1986). Heat acclimatization likely is only ever optimum in those who are born in the hotter parts of the world and who train regularly in the heat.

    Thus, sometime in the weeks leading up to a hot-weather race, you should undergo heat acclimatization either by running in the midday heat or by training in a track suit. How Ron Daws used the track suit technique to earn a place on the 1968 Olympic Marathon is detailed in his book (Daws, 1977) and should be read by those who are forced to compete in the heat but who live and train in cool climates.

"Buddy Edelen and Ron Daws were runners I knew who used to train in multiple sweatsuits to teach themselves to tolerate the heat better." - Hal Higdon

[This message has been edited by leon2 (edited Jun-21-2005).]

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VictorN
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 09:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for VictorN   Click Here to Email VictorN     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree that you should train in the heat if you are going to race in the heat, but I remember seeing an article in a Tri magazine stating that you can acclimate to heat by training as little as 10 minutes a day in the heat (unfortunately, I can't find it nor could I find a link). I think they also said you needed to do this for 2-weeks. Their recipe for people headed to Ironman HI was to suit up with lots of layers and spin for 10 minutes on a bike trainer. The rest of the workout should be under cooler temps if possible so that you can get a quality workout.

That sounds pretty reasonable to me. You need to balance the need to acclimate to the heat with the benefit of a quality workout.

Victor

------------------
www.competitiverunner.com

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VictorN
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 10:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for VictorN   Click Here to Email VictorN     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
All you wanted to know about heat illness...

http://www.bordeninstitute.army.mil/medaspofharshenvrnmnts/Ch7-ClinicalDiagnosisofHeatIllness.pdf

Of interest:
Heat exposure and regular strenuous exercise produce heat acclimatization, which improves the body’s response to heat stress within a few days. Most of the physiological improvement in heat tolerance occurs within 10 days of combined heat exposure and regular exercise. In acclimatized individuals blood volume increases, stroke volume increases, the heart rate is lower, metabolic generation of heat decreases slightly, sweating begins earlier with a higher sweat rate and lower sodium content, and the threshold for cutaneous vasodilation is reduced. These changes improve transfer of body heat from the core to the skin and enhance heat dissipation at the skin. Although sodium is conserved with heat acclimatization, water losses are not reduced because sweat volume increases.

Victor

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fredurie
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 10:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fredurie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I use to run on the spot in the sauna until I got dizzy, but I wouldn't
recommend it.

Once you cook your core, you might be messed up for quite a while.

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tigger
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 12:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tigger     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There has been a lot of research done on adaptation to hot work conditions in S African and Australian mines. It's equally useful for running in hot conditions. One major difference is that underground mines don't have any sun impact, wheras runners do. The heat load from the sun (on a sunny day) is pretty much equal to that generated by metabolism.

Personally I avoid running in hot conditions because I'm not interested in suffering. I'll head for an indoor track or a treadmill if I have to.

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Miles and Miles
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Miles and Miles     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I almost always run in the hottest part of the day. It's not any special training, but rather just because I am too stupid to know any better.

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tigger
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 04:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for tigger     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Miles and Miles:
I almost always run in the hottest part of the day. It's not any special training, but rather just because I am too stupid to know any better.

You undersell your strategy! Training for an OQ and training for a PB are different I think. You're going for that last percent improvment & clearly there's some to be had from acclimitizing to hot weather, particularly if the race is in hot conditions. For slowpokes like me it's not as important because of greater possible improvments from things like losing weight!

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Miles and Miles
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 05:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Miles and Miles     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't think heat training is important to me either. I run at around 4PM everyday because that's when it fits into real life. If I had a choice I would run at 8AM everyday. If I were running in Athens I might think about it, but I am not. I run road races that are all at around 8AM. My last big race was the Olympic Trials that were in the snow. Should I have trained in the middle of the night naked for that one? Cold Training? I haven't done all the research or anything, but I would agree "heat training" would be appropriate for races in the heat. My 2 cents.

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maryt
Cool Runner
posted Jun-21-2005 07:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for maryt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Victor
Wow! That is indeed everything you wanted to know about heat illness. Thanks!

I have a race coming up Sunday that will be at 10am and probably mid 80s, so today I ran when the temp was about 85 degrees, because I do need to acclimitize. But if I didn't have a hot weather race coming up, I'm of the same mind as tigger and miles and miles, and I sure wouldn't go out of my way to pile on extra clothing or use a sauna to get my body temp elevated just as a training tool.

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leon2
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 12:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for leon2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is an interesting paper on heat training -- A model for heat training-the Davies heat model. It's almost a must-read document for anyone interested in heat training.

    "The purpose of this paper is to present a model for heat training, together with strategies to help reduce the heat's potential depleting effects on performance.
    ...
    A key concept of the Davies Heat Model is the notion that, especially for events that are both strenuous and extensive, a far greater time span is needed for full heat acclimatisation for optimum athletic performance than the textbook 7-14 days (Wilmore and Costill, 1999). Indeed, the very observance of this two-week acclimatisation period has probably been the underlying cause of numerous failures of high profile athletes when confronted by warm to hot conditions.
    ...
    the three medal winners had all been training for three months in conditions similar to those experienced in Los Angeles, and that this may just have had something to do with their subsequent success."

I also want to share an article that explains the sauna method that I use. There are also links to other articles about heat training.

Heat Training in the Sauna

Edited to add that I modify the regimen described in the article. And that's one of the good things about this kind of training -- you can set the temperature to whatever you want.

[This message has been edited by leon2 (edited Jun-22-2005).]

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Miles and Miles
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 12:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Miles and Miles     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Leon,

Are you training for a race in the heat?

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fredurie
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 12:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fredurie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Steve Spence.

http://www.coachr.org/heattraining.htm

http://www.mensracing.com/athletes/interviews/stevespence.html

[This message has been edited by fredurie (edited Jun-22-2005).]

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leon2
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 12:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for leon2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Miles and Miles:
Are you training for a race in the heat?

Yes. The marathon has always had warm conditions -- at least it has been very warm the 2 times I have run it -- temperatures in the mid to high 70s. Changing the start time to a half an hour earlier, as they did last year, didn't help much. It's still warm. And I plan to run a half marathon in August. And both of these races are not only in warm conditions, but they're at altitude. And they're hilly. The half marathon starts at 8,000 feet. So I'll want to do some altitude training as well up on Barr Trail. I'm also considering a 12K trail race in July. The combined conditions of heat, altitude, and hills mean that we have to prepare a bit differently than people at sea level. But that's what makes racing in Colorado so interesting, and challenging.

But hopefully the information about heat training will be of use or interest to others, not just myself. That was the purpose of this topic.

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leon2
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 01:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for leon2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by fredurie:
Steve Spence.

http://www.mensracing.com/athletes/interviews/stevespence.html



Fred, I read that interview with Steve Spence a while ago. I have learned a great deal from him with regards to the way he prepared for Tokyo. Not only about his preparations for the heat, but his strength training regimen as well. I knew that he used glycerol. What I didn't know until recently is that Keith Brantly has also used glycerol. I just learned that last night. Hopefully we can get him to comment on how he prepared for racing in the heat. It was very warm for his Olympic marathon in Atlanta.

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AndyHass
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 03:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AndyHass   Click Here to Email AndyHass     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree that it is good to get acclimated before a big race with anticipated hot weather, but I don't think it's good to do all of your training in the heat. At least for me, I can't get the same benefits in the heat during hard workouts that I would get doing them in the early AM or late PM when it's cooler. Repeats slow down when I start to overheat, and my legs simply don't get the same kind of workout they would if it were cooler and I could push them harder. I guess I'd say you need to acclimatize, but I'd only do it for a portion of runs.
Yesterday it was near 90 (moderately humid) and I attempted 6Xmile with 3min recovery. Goal was 5:05 working down to 4:55 -- I was confident it was doable. I went 5:04-:06-:09-:08, suffering from heat problems and stopping at 4. Not nearly the benefit I would have gotten from the planned workout under better conditions, from how it felt (like crap). I think I'll only do my workouts in cooler conditions until my easier runs (run in the hotter times) get me more used to the heat.

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leon2
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 03:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for leon2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by AndyHass:
I agree that it is good to get acclimated before a big race with anticipated hot weather, but I don't think it's good to do all of your training in the heat.

That's something that I'm hoping people understood already.

No. I don't intend to spend the entire summer slogging around at a snail's pace at high noon and sweating profusely. And that's not what I would advise to anyone else.

I did a 9-miler this morning while it was relatively cool -- a good workout. But I balance that with a good amount of heat training as well. And this is where the sauna comes in. I can do a hard workout in the morning while it's cool. Then in the evening, sit in the sauna at the gym for 30-45 minutes and do some heat training. It has worked very well for me in the past in terms of being able to handle the heat. On easy recovery days I'll do some running in the heat. My long runs usually start when it's cool and end when it's warm. So there's a bit of balance there as well. I mix it up. Those are the kinds of things I'd like to hear from others -- how they blend heat training into their program. We can share ideas and learn from each other.

[This message has been edited by leon2 (edited Jun-22-2005).]

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hopper3011
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 04:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for hopper3011   Click Here to Email hopper3011     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
I don't see any benefit to running in the heat if you can avoid it. I don't buy that bit about increasing oxygen uptake in a manner similar to altitude - I'd sure like to see more info on that than a post on Let's Run for proof
So you don't consider being able to run sub-2:10 a benefit? There are precisely 13 American men who have ever done that, so if he says heat training is beneficial, that's good enough for me.
I agree that the mechanism by which heat training improves your running may not be exactly what Benji says it is, but who actually cares? The improvement is what counts, not the mechanism. Or have you forgotten that?

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maryt
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 06:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for maryt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hopper3011:
[QUOTE]I don't see any benefit to running in the heat if you can avoid it. I don't buy that bit about increasing oxygen uptake in a manner similar to altitude - I'd sure like to see more info on that than a post on Let's Run for proof
So you don't consider being able to run sub-2:10 a benefit? There are precisely 13 American men who have ever done that, so if he says heat training is beneficial, that's good enough for me.
I agree that the mechanism by which heat training improves your running may not be exactly what Benji says it is, but who actually cares? The improvement is what counts, not the mechanism. Or have you forgotten that?

Benji did a lot of different things in training, and while it's extremely important to train in the heat if you are going to RACE in the heat, I still would like to see something more than that single post before I would advocate running with extra clothing when the temp is already over 80 just to make yourself hotter if you are NOT going to race in the heat. The amount of blood that goes to your muscles is higher, you can run faster and further when it's cooler. I must admit, however, that I did take note of somthing else that Benji mentioned - his mileage. Perhaps his relatively conservative approach to mileage was at least as responsible to his success as his heat training, yes? And no one should run more than 85-95 mpw? After all, he is one of "precisely 13 American men who have ever run under 2:10"
quote:
I ran 85-95 for most of my good years. I spent a year at 110-120. My best before that period was 2:10:41. My best during that period was 2:12:12. It took a year of running 85-95 before I got back to sub 2:12

I still think Leon is overdoing it with that running with extra clothing when the temp is already over 80 - 80 should be plenty hot enough without risking heatstroke, even if he is preparing for a race - in the 70s, not the 80s, by the way. The Davies model posted by both fredurie and Leon says to train at the temp of your race OR BELOW if your race temp will be 80 or over.

quote:
Training is best done in the temperature zone that best matches the anticipated competition temperature, with the following considerations: If it is anticipated that competition temperature will be above 27 C, then training in the zone below the anticipated conditions may be the best option to help ensure under training in relation to the heat. (Note: For those of us who don't use the metric system, that's 80F),

so Leon's own link says he's already training at too hot a temp without adding extra clothes to make it even warmer.

When I was training in the middle of a New England winter to race in New Zealand (where it would be summer) I did add more clothing to try to get at least little bit acclimitized, but add more clothing when it's already 80? I think not! Not worth the risk. Not the way I might have put it, but I like what fredurie said:

quote:
Once you cook your core, you might be messed up for quite a while.

[This message has been edited by maryt (edited Jun-22-2005).]

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lancenhouston
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 06:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lancenhouston   Click Here to Email lancenhouston     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I train here in Houston and have been maintaining at least 40 miles a week for 6 of the last 7 weeks. More than half of my miles are in the heat. I'm talking 5:45 PM, 94, 95 degrees. I do at least two runs a week of 7.1 miles at that time each week, along with speedwork one day a week at that time. Additionally I do a 2nd speedwork session at lunchtime one day a week when temps are typically around 90 or so. And the humidity is atrocious here as well. I do a couple of shorter AM runs each week, and save my tempo and race-simulation runs for 9 or 10 PM, when the humidity is still lower but the temps have come down.

I train in the heat for a few reasons. It's when I have the time, but I also wanted to get acclimatized as quickly as possible. We may have daytime highs in the 90s into October so the sooner I get used to it the better equipped I am to maximize my workouts, regardless of the conditions. The key is to use the transistion months of April and May to gradually get used to it.

I'm acclimated enough now that I can run hard for up to 5 in the hottest part of the day, something I never thought possible. And I've also noticed what was mentioned above - as I've adapted I still sweat profusely, but don't require a sports drink for recovery so much as simple chilled water.

I'm also doing a 15K up in Dallas at the end of July. While it's a morning run, it's still going to be warm and I should have a decided advantage over the non-adapted runners, particularly in the second half of the race.

But I've never thought about intentionally adding any layers of clothing. I run in shorts, shoes and a headband, along with sunglasses most days.

I don't like the heat any more than the next guy but it goes with the territory.

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leon2
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 06:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for leon2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by maryt:
but I like what fredurie said:

Once you cook your core, you might be messed up for quite a while.



You tend to exaggerate. And you definitely take things out of context. Why didn't you post everything that he wrote ...?

quote:
Originally posted by fredurie:
I use to run on the spot in the sauna until I got dizzy, but I wouldn't recommend it.

Once you cook your core, you might be messed up for quite a while.


No one here is suggesting that you run on the spot in the sauna ... until you get dizzy.

Good grief.

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leon2
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 06:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for leon2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by lancenhouston:
I'm acclimated enough now that I can run hard for up to 5 in the hottest part of the day, something I never thought possible.

That's good. It sounds like you've benefited a great deal from training in the heat. And that's the goal -- to be able to raise the intensity of the workouts in the heat and be able to handle race conditions that are hot.

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maryt
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 07:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for maryt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by leon2:
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by maryt:
but I like what fredurie said:
Once you cook your core, you might be messed up for quite a while.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


You tend to exaggerate. And you definitely take things out of context. Why didn't you post everything that he wrote ...?.


What did I exagerate? Did you not say

quote:
On my training run today I wore a tshirt, a nylon vest, nylon pants, and a cap. The temperature was in the low 80s. In the near future I'll start a heat training program that partly involves using the sauna

That's certainly running with extra clothes when the temp is already over 80 and most certainly not what your link from the Davies heat model would recommend, especially since you're planning on running a race that is likely to be cooler than 80, not hotter.

Getting heat acclimitized for a hot race is a good thing. I don't think anyone doubts that and I do it myself, but by carrying it to such extremes, I think you are risking heat-related problems that may seriously effect your health and your training as well. As for quoting fred out of context - just liked the sound of what fred said, "cook your core...," rather than the more pedantic you are risking heat problems.... and just wanted to give credit for the "cool" phrase.

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leon2
Cool Runner
posted Jun-22-2005 07:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for leon2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by maryt:
... you're planning on running a race that is likely to be cooler than 80, not hotter.

I cannot forecast the weather in September in Colorado. And I definitely cannot control it. The only thing I can do is prepare as well as I can. It could be 90 degrees that day. (By the way, it snowed yesterday. That's Colorado.)

I want to repeat what Bill Rodgers said because it's the main objective of heat training ...

    "Your body is an adaptive mechanism; if you create a stress at the correct intensity the body will respond and get stronger. By piling on layers (this will be different for different people) the body actually does get hotter, even to the point of "over-heating." This over-heating creates a stress which, if not taken too far, will make the body more heat resistant."

The message that he's conveying, and what I've experienced myself, is that the body adapts, if you don't go overboard. It really does adapt. It's remarkable.

I wear pants on my training runs all year round - some heavier than others. I stay well-hydrated, and I always carry a water bottle during my training runs in hot weather. If I'm not drinking it, I can pour it over my head to cool off. And in 30+ years of running I have never suffered any kind of heat injury - mostly because I know the symptoms. But I never go so far that I even experience those symptoms.

I appreciate your concern for my safety, but could you shift your focus away from me so that we can discuss the benefits of heat training, ways of doing it, etc.?

Andy and lancenhouston offered some very good input. I'd like to get more of that, and less of me. I don't want to be the focal point of this topic. I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks.

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