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Chocolate Milk: The new sports drink?

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Author Topic:   Chocolate Milk: The new sports drink?
cipher
Cool Runner
posted Feb-24-2006 07:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cipher     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
An interesting article from Fox News

And to think that I only drank it because I'm a chocoholic...

quote:

During a 2004 Summer Olympics awash in controversies over steroids and supplements, one sportswriter wryly noticed that top American swimmer Michael Phelps was playing it safe -- he preferred to drink Carnation Instant Breakfast between races.

Now it appears that the six-time gold medalist may have been onto something. A new study shows that plain old chocolate milk may be as good -- or better -- than sports drinks like Gatorade at helping athletes recover from strenuous exercise.

The study, published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, was small in scale; it was partially funded by the dairy industry. But dietitians say the study should help to counter the notion that high-tech, expensive supplements are better than whole foods when it comes to athletic performance. They also note that milk contains key nutrients, such as calcium and vitamin D, in quantities that sports drinks can’t match.

“[Milk] is a sports drink ‘plus,’” Keith Ayoob, EdD, a registered dietitian and associate professor of pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, tells WebMD. “It will supply you with things you need whether or not you’re working out.”

The study builds on findings that intense endurance exercise reduces the muscles’ supply of stored glucose, or glycogen, a key source of fuel for exercise. To maximize glycogen replacement, the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Dietetic Association recommend taking in a serving of carbohydrates within 30 minutes after a long and vigorous workout.

Milk vs. Sports Drinks

Common sports drinks such as Gatorade supply those carbs, as well as fluids and electrolytes lost through sweat. However, more recent research suggests that adding protein to the mix may further hasten recovery. Hence the new wave of drinks such as Endurox R4 that include protein as well as higher doses of carbs.

In the study, nine male cyclists rode until their muscles were depleted of energy, then rested four hours and biked again until exhaustion. During the rest period, the cyclists drank low-fat chocolate milk, Gatorade, or Endurox R4. During a second round of exercise, the cyclists who drank the chocolate milk were able to bike about 50% longer than those who drank Endurox, and about as long as those who drank the Gatorade.

The findings suggest that chocolate milk has an optimal ratio of carbohydrates to protein to help refuel tired muscles, researcher Joel M. Stager, PhD, Indiana University kinesiology professor, tells WebMD.

But the most puzzling result of the study, experts say, was why Endurox -- which has the same carb-to-protein ratio as the chocolate milk -- fared so poorly. Researcher Jeanne D. Johnston, MA, tells WebMD it may have to do with the different composition of the sugars in the milk. Another theory is that the sugars in the milk may be better absorbed in the gut than those in the Endurox.

Edward F. Coyle, PhD, a researcher on exercise and hydration at the University of Texas, tells WebMD the trial would have been stronger if the researchers had also tested the effect of flavored water or another dummy (placebo) drink.

The study was partly funded by the Dairy and Nutrition Council, an industry group. Coyle says that the study’s reliance on industry funding is not unusual in the world of sports research, as federal funding for such research is hard to come by.

Marathon Runners Drink Too Much

A Cheaper Alternative?

While rapid nutrient replacement may not be important for casual exercisers, it can make a big difference in performance for competitive athletes who work out vigorously once or twice a day, says Roberta Anding, a sports dietitian and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.

Anding has long recommended chocolate milk for young athletes who come to her practice at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston. For children and teenagers from lower-income families, it doesn’t make sense to spend serious money on sports drinks when they can get milk as part of a subsidized lunch program, she tells WebMD. The only advantage of sports drinks, she notes, is that they never spoil.

Ayoob estimates that more than two-thirds of teenagers should be drinking more milk anyway because they don’t get enough calcium in their diets. He also recommends milk for its vitamin D and potassium content. “For me, this is a no-brainer,” he says.

By Richard Sine, reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD

SOURCES: Karp, J. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 2006; (16: 78-91). “Nutrition and athletic performance -- Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine,” Svrluga, Barry, “Olympics Swim Trials,” Washington Post, July 13, 2004, Jeanne Johnston, department of kinesiology, Indiana University at Bloomington. Joel M. Stager, PhD, department of kinesiology, Indiana University at Bloomington; Keith Ayoob, EdD, RD, associate professor of pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Edward F. Coyle, PhD, professor, kinesiology and health education, University of Texas. Roberta Anding, clinical and sports dietitian, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston.


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Notey
Cool Runner
posted Feb-24-2006 07:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Notey   Click Here to Email Notey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My only problem with this is that no one ever said that Gatorade was a good recovery drink. It's good to replenish while still exercising not once you are done.

I am surprised about the chocolate milk faring better than Endurox. The subjects began exercising again only 4 hours after. I wonder what the results would have been if it were longer period...say 12 to 24 hours. I think Endurox does more than just replenish glycogen stores, which I think is what the milk is doing quicker. The added protein and vitamins and the in the Endurox promotes healing, etc. I'll keep drinking my Endurox, thank you.

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Ice Cream
Cool Runner
posted Feb-24-2006 09:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ice Cream     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Notey:
My only problem with this is that no one ever said that Gatorade was a good recovery drink. It's good to replenish while still exercising not once you are done.

I am surprised about the chocolate milk faring better than Endurox. The subjects began exercising again only 4 hours after. I wonder what the results would have been if it were longer period...say 12 to 24 hours. I think Endurox does more than just replenish glycogen stores, which I think is what the milk is doing quicker. The added protein and vitamins and the in the Endurox promotes healing, etc. I'll keep drinking my Endurox, thank you.


I have a recovery drink by gatorade. It was a sample from some marathon expo, and I have not used it yet. It has protein in it.

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actonrunner
Cool Runner
posted Feb-24-2006 09:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for actonrunner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Chocolate milk is my favorite recovery drink. I love having a nice tall glass of it after a 20 miler.

P.S. I'm surprised the anti-milk crew has taken so long to jump on this thread. Any minute now we shoould start seeing links to those milk is poison websites....

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moroccangirl
Cool Runner
posted Feb-24-2006 11:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for moroccangirl     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have heard this quite a few times, something about the choc milk having the right balance of carbs/protein.

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kspowell
Cool Runner
posted Feb-24-2006 11:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kspowell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by moroccangirl:
I have heard this quite a few times, something about the choc milk having the right balance of carbs/protein.

Yes, a 4:1 ratio of carbohydrate to protein is touted to promote glycogen repletion (the carbs) and skeletal muscle repair (the protein). I like plain old skim milk too, even w/o the chocolate. It doesn't have as many grams of carbohydrate as the chocolate variety though. I often have a glass of orange juice and a glass of milk (not mixed together, mind you) after a run. The OJ certainly bumps the ratio in favor of carbs. It's a good way to get calories into your depleted body (when you might not want to down solid food right away), plus, since these are liquids, you're also improving your hydration status.

------------------
New pic, new PR at Chicago 2005
Positive thoughts--negative splits!

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ttsanford001
Cool Runner
posted Feb-24-2006 11:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ttsanford001   Click Here to Email ttsanford001     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by moroccangirl:
I have heard this quite a few times, something about the choc milk having the right balance of carbs/protein.


SlimFast shakes also have the same 4:1 carb ratio.

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ZZenko
Cool Runner
posted Feb-24-2006 11:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ZZenko   Click Here to Email ZZenko     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
doesn't it make you guys cramp up?

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divechief
Cool Runner
posted Feb-25-2006 12:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for divechief   Click Here to Email divechief     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ttsanford001:

SlimFast shakes also have the same 4:1 carb ratio.

Double check the label on those SlimFasts. They used to be my recovery drink of choice, but they switched to a low carb version

If you have a source for the origional recipe, I suggest you stock up, I switched to low fat Chocolate milk about a year ago.

------------------
about me

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ttsanford001
Cool Runner
posted Feb-25-2006 12:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for ttsanford001   Click Here to Email ttsanford001     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by divechief:
Double check the label on those SlimFasts. They used to be my recovery drink of choice, but they switched to a low carb version

If you have a source for the origional recipe, I suggest you stock up, I switched to low fat Chocolate milk about a year ago.


Yeah, you can't go with the Optima line - only the original recipe which is still sold at my grocery store.

------------------
Me
Someone may beat me today, but they're gonna have to bleed to do it. - Steve Prefontaine

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dg12
Cool Runner
posted Feb-25-2006 12:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dg12   Click Here to Email dg12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ttsanford001:

SlimFast shakes also have the same 4:1 carb ratio.

The Runner's Ultimate Nutritional Recovery Routine (RUNRR)
You'll be amazed at how good you feel the next day
by Greg McMillan, M.S.


http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/nutrition/mcmillannutritioncalculator1.htm

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JJJessee
Cool Runner
posted Feb-25-2006 12:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for JJJessee     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I wonder about Chocolate Soy Milk,like Silk, as a recovery drink?
JJ

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MikeBro
Cool Runner
posted Feb-25-2006 01:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MikeBro   Click Here to Email MikeBro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Notey:
I am surprised about the chocolate milk faring better than Endurox. The subjects began exercising again only 4 hours after. I wonder what the results would have been if it were longer period...say 12 to 24 hours. I think Endurox does more than just replenish glycogen stores, which I think is what the milk is doing quicker. The added protein and vitamins and the in the Endurox promotes healing, etc. I'll keep drinking my Endurox, thank you.

So, you're thinking that there's something in Endurox that's very slow-acting? I dunno--like what? How do you think the carbs, protein, and "vitamins" in Endurox are any different that what's in chocolate milk? (Are there vitamins in Endurox? Or just artificial stuff with funny-sounding names?) I think the Endurox people are selling snake oil. Are there any *independent* studies that show Endurox has any effect beyond choc milk, or any effect at all? I'm sure there's lots of "proof" from Endurox-sponsored studies. Unless there's a truly independent study showing that all the added chemicals and crap in Endurox have any effect beyond the carbs and protein (which you can get much cheaper via other sources), it's all snake oil.

I used to use Slim Fast until I noticed that I get the same carbs and protein from skim milk mixed with Nestle's Quik. It's vastly cheaper too. I've also used choc soy milk, but it's pretty expensive and not as tasty as skim choc milk.

------------------
Me

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cipher
Cool Runner
posted Feb-25-2006 12:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cipher     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ZZenko:
doesn't it make you guys cramp up?

If you're lactose intolerant, then yes, you can get cramps.

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bigapplepie
Cool Runner
posted Feb-25-2006 06:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bigapplepie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeBro:
So, you're thinking that there's something in Endurox that's very slow-acting? I dunno--like what? How do you think the carbs, protein, and "vitamins" in Endurox are any different that what's in chocolate milk? (Are there vitamins in Endurox? Or just artificial stuff with funny-sounding names?) I think the Endurox people are selling snake oil. Are there any *independent* studies that show Endurox has any effect beyond choc milk, or any effect at all? I'm sure there's lots of "proof" from Endurox-sponsored studies. Unless there's a truly independent study showing that all the added chemicals and crap in Endurox have any effect beyond the carbs and protein (which you can get much cheaper via other sources), it's all snake oil.

I used to use Slim Fast until I noticed that I get the same carbs and protein from skim milk mixed with Nestle's Quik. It's vastly cheaper too. I've also used choc soy milk, but it's pretty expensive and not as tasty as skim choc milk.

[/B]



Endurox includes vitamins, especially vitamin E. There is 1100% of the RDA which just scares me.

Fast acting carbs are best for recovery drinks. Its the only time that simple carbs should be consumed in preference to complex carbs (unless you have a sweet tooth )

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cipher
Cool Runner
posted Feb-25-2006 06:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cipher     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bigapplepie:

Endurox includes vitamins, especially vitamin E. There is 1100% of the RDA which just scares me.

Fast acting carbs are best for recovery drinks. Its the only time that simple carbs should be consumed in preference to complex carbs (unless you have a sweet tooth )[/B]


I read the the vitamin E in Endurox is dl-alpha-tocopherol, the synthetic form. Some say that the natural form is much more easily absorbed than the synthetic form.

[This message has been edited by cipher (edited Feb-25-2006).]

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Notey
Cool Runner
posted Feb-26-2006 11:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Notey   Click Here to Email Notey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeBro:
So, you're thinking that there's something in Endurox that's very slow-acting? I dunno--like what? How do you think the carbs, protein, and "vitamins" in Endurox are any different that what's in chocolate milk? (Are there vitamins in Endurox? Or just artificial stuff with funny-sounding names?) I think the Endurox people are selling snake oil. Are there any *independent* studies that show Endurox has any effect beyond choc milk, or any effect at all? I'm sure there's lots of "proof" from Endurox-sponsored studies. Unless there's a truly independent study showing that all the added chemicals and crap in Endurox have any effect beyond the carbs and protein (which you can get much cheaper via other sources), it's all snake oil.

I used to use Slim Fast until I noticed that I get the same carbs and protein from skim milk mixed with Nestle's Quik. It's vastly cheaper too. I've also used choc soy milk, but it's pretty expensive and not as tasty as skim choc milk.



I believe that Endurox works. I know my recovery time after long runs diminished when I began using it, but at the same time the decrease in recovery time could just be from the benefits of increased training over time. It's become part of my post long run ritual.

My reasoning in inquiring if perhaps Endurox might be a better aid in recovery over a longer time period stems from the fact that the recovery time used in the studies is so brief. How many people need to recover as quickly as 4 hours? In addition to having the 4:1 carbs to protein, Endurox does have an extensive list of vitamins and supplements that aid in the recovery process. Perhaps it takes more time for Endurox's recovery process? Maybe Endurox is selling snake oil. I don't claim to have any answers.

Here's some information on the science behind Endurox.

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kspowell
Cool Runner
posted Feb-26-2006 11:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kspowell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think that MikeBro and others (myself included) are putting emphasis on consuming "real" as opposed to "engineered" foods. I don't think Endurox is bad by any means, but I think that foods/drinks that are fortified through the addition of vitamins and minerals are not as good a source of those vites and mins as foods in which they naturally occur.

I know this is to the extreme, but just think about someone who eats a variety of fruits and vegetables to attain their RDA for vitamins and minerals as compared to a person who forgoes all fruits and vegetables and thinks they're fine because they take a multi-vitamin supplement each day. They may be all right, but there are additional beneficial components to fruits and vegetables than just the V&M they contain. Mechanisms of action of the additional components are yet to be elucidated in many cases. Plus the supplement-taker is missing out on valuable phytochemicals and sources of fiber.

As a graduate student in nutrition, and a soon-to-be registered dietitian, I can attest to the fact that the American Dietetic Association (as well as my school curriculum) emphasizes eating whole foods as the better route than consuming a poor diet and attempting to make up for it by taking a multi.

------------------
New pic, new PR at Chicago 2005
Positive thoughts--negative splits!

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kspowell
Cool Runner
posted Feb-26-2006 11:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kspowell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Forgot to mention that bioavailability of vitamins and minerals from sources in which they naturally occur is usually far greater than that from supplements or fortified foods & beverages.

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CSuzette
Cool Runner
posted Feb-27-2006 09:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for CSuzette     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by actonrunner:
Chocolate milk is my favorite recovery drink. I love having a nice tall glass of it after a 20 miler.

P.S. I'm surprised the anti-milk crew has taken so long to jump on this thread. Any minute now we shoould start seeing links to those milk is poison websites....


What would be the point? You have obviously already made up your mind.

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MikeBro
Cool Runner
posted Feb-27-2006 02:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MikeBro   Click Here to Email MikeBro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Notey:
I believe that Endurox works. I know my recovery time after long runs diminished when I began using it, but at the same time the decrease in recovery time could just be from the benefits of increased training over time.

Notey -- JMO, but I think the latter explanation you provided is more likely than the former. I've been bumping my weekly long runs up for a while now and I've noticed that I'm recovering from them faster despite the increased distance. I'm now in the 20-21 mile range for a weekly long run and have gone from being unable to run the next day to regularly doing an easy run of 5-8 miles the next day.

Now, I *could* say the glass of chocolate milk after each run is what did it, but I'd prefer to think it's adaptation.

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Notey
Cool Runner
posted Feb-27-2006 02:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Notey   Click Here to Email Notey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeBro:
Notey -- JMO, but I think the latter explanation you provided is more likely than the former. I've been bumping my weekly long runs up for a while now and I've noticed that I'm recovering from them faster despite the increased distance. I'm now in the 20-21 mile range for a weekly long run and have gone from being unable to run the next day to regularly doing an easy run of 5-8 miles the next day.

Now, I *could* say the glass of chocolate milk after each run is what did it, but I'd prefer to think it's adaptation.


At the same time I started taking ice baths as well. I like to think it's a combination. IMO there's no doubt it all helps. How much? We'll never know...too many variables. This study doesn't convince me either way.

[This message has been edited by Notey (edited Feb-27-2006).]

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MikeBro
Cool Runner
posted Mar-02-2006 05:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MikeBro   Click Here to Email MikeBro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just an amusing and non-conclusive little sidenote here:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/03/060302091856.htm

Here's the text of the article:

Source: University of Auckland

Posted: March 2, 2006
Chocolate Milk Could Be Key To Longer, Healthier Life

The popular saying goes that 70 is the new 60 and 60 is the new 50, unfortunately for much of New Zealand's aging population declining muscle function means it simply isn't true.

New research however from The University of Auckland's Faculty of Science aims to develop a non-pharmaceutical means to maintain muscle function and quality of life in older individuals. The good news is the answer could be as simple as taking a stroll followed by a glass of chocolate milk.

Senior lecturer at the Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Dr Benjamin Miller, says the goal of his research is not to make athletes out of the elderly, but to increase our lifespan and quality of life in old age.

"The ability of people to create energy and perform work stems from structures that exist inside our cells called mitochondria. As we grow older the amount of mitochondria we have decreases and with it our respiratory capacity.

"This decline is determined by the turnover of proteins in the mitochondria. We hope to highlight an effective and easy way to maintain the protein content in muscles or at least replace old and damaged proteins with new ones."

With funding assistance from the New Zealand Health Research Council, Dr Miller and PhD student Cheryl Murphy, asked a group of elderly kiwis to perform two identical sessions of aerobic exercise on a stationary bike. After one session the participants were asked to drink a mixture of protein and carbohydrate (e.g. sweetened milk) and after the other just carbohydrates.

It is well known that consuming proteins and sugars after resistance training increases the synthesis of proteins used for force i.e. it builds muscles. Dr Miller's research will tell us whether doing the same after aerobic exercise can also increase the synthesis of mitochondrial proteins which affect our ability to make energy and play a large role in our mortality.

"We know of course that exercise has a wide variety of health benefits, but our research specifically targets mitochondria since they are a cause of age-related decreases in muscle function.

"If successful, we could prove that our non-pharmaceutical means to increase muscle quality could mean that a practice as simple as drinking a Milo after exercise may help reduce our morbidity and prolong mortality."

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Offseason
Member
posted Mar-18-2006 10:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Offseason     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is a choco taco the same as choc milk? If it is, you should try one . . . and not only after a long run. They make a great treat anytime. Still waiting for the choco burrito, choco chalupa, choco nacho . . . oh the insanity!!

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