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Tabloid Training

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Author Topic:   Tabloid Training
kevinm
Administrator
posted Jan-23-2006 05:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kevinm     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Run a qualifying marathon - training only 3 days a week!

No it's not a late night info-mercial for the latest fitness program. Nor have I sunk to the depths of yellow journalism. There's actually some truth to this one. We did it and you can too.

I'm going to pass one my personal experience with the 'train 3 days a week' program. My running buddy, (we'll refer to him as 'Ted'), and I both used a 3-day a week program this fall to qualify. I'll attempt to give a practitioner's rendition of the pros and cons of it. I'll talk about what we would do differently and how effective it was.

As always, this is free advice and worth every penny! Be warned that neither of us followed the proscribed plan religiously. We changed it to suit ourselves, but I think there are some inferences that while not scientifically rigorous are still valid.

This is an extract of a recent article written by Chris Russell.

The rest of the article can be seen at: http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/6/6_1/tabloid-training.shtml

If you have any opinion about the article we invite you to post it here.

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JaiRunner
Cool Runner
posted Jan-30-2006 07:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JaiRunner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Hey there,

I read an article about this plan and I see the benefits. If you are new to the sport, have injuries, or time issues. Yeah, great. Its a solid training plan.

be aware, though. I don't think you will ever reach your full potential this way. Its a good one season fix to not having enough time. This isn't what any of the best athletes do or the top coaches recommend. That says something in my book. Good for one season, but i don' think its great for the long run. Again, if you fit in a special category (injury, old, or disabled), I can see the benefits.

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andrephilly
Cool Runner
posted Mar-02-2006 08:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for andrephilly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am a faithful runner, but certainly low mileage by most standards in these forums.I've run tones of 5 milers, 10k's and several 10 milers over the past 15 years.I ran the Philly half mara a few years ago in 1:49.

I recently decided to plan for my first marathon this fall. But I know that, while faithful, I am not committed to running 5-6 days a week. So I have already devised my plan and it is based on 3 days a week running,,, so I read this article with great interest.

Thank you for writing it.

Our plans are similar in many ways. Your is an 18 week, mine is 20 weeks,, the total miles run averaged by week is very close. I constructed my plan with 3 objectives:
a - do what I enjoy
b - avoid injury and or burnout
c - build up to 20+ mile training runs

My plan has 2 midweek runs every week. They are anywhere from 5 to 9 miles in length,,, all at my half pace (8:20). Every weekend, I will have 1 workout. They alternate between speed one week, long run the next week and so on. I will enjoy and stay on track with long runs, if I know its only every other week. My Long runs build to 2-21 milers, then 3 week taper. Hope to do long runs at 9:00 - 9:30. I enjoy going to the track. My speed work outs are alternating Yasso 800's,,, then mile repeats. Building speed work to 10 800's, and 5 mile repeats. Mile repeats at 5k (7:35) pace (or better).On off days I'll be lifting/biking at the YMCA.

My goal is not just finish, but break 4 hours. I have a 10 mile race 1/3 way through and another philly 1/2 to gauge my estimated marathon pace. Yasso's also as predictor. I will go into the run with a good target pace. With 2 20+ I will be confident of the distance.

I agree with Jairunner in some way that it doesn't reach my full potential,,, but disagree in another way that given my life and relative importance of the race, this is my full potential.

I don't expect to revolutionize marathon training for real runners. But for 40+ yr old (male) mid-packers like me, I hope to show that you don't have to make time for 5-6 days a week and pound your legs with 50-60 miles a week to have a good marathon experience.

While I obviously agree with your plan,, it did floor me how you snuck in that little jewel - (by the way I ran 2 warm up marathons). To a first timer (me) that somewhat invalidated the whole premise. Nevertheless, I took your article as validation of my approach. And I once again thank you for your insight.

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wyetri
Member
posted Apr-13-2006 02:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for wyetri     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You are obviously referring to the FIRST program. I would suggest going to the website, http://www.furman.edu/first/1.htm, and not just planning from the RW article. There are two levels of training plans - beginner and internediate. This would address one of your critiques of not enough 20+ milers. In the intermediate plan, there are four 20 milers. As far as speed work not being fast enough, well, run faster. I don't think it hurts having a better than planned pace as long as you're not running every tempo run in zone 5.
This winter, while training for a spring marathon, my orthotics wore out and I developed ITBS right after my first 20 miler. But before that happened, I had gotten significantly faster - both top end speed (400, 800 repeats) and during my long runs (pace relative to heart rate). Eventhough I had to scale back my training to recuperate I managed to PR a half marathon and get 1st in my age group. I'm a believer. And three days/week fits very nicely into a triathlon training plan.

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dianarunner
Member
posted Apr-23-2006 02:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dianarunner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As a novice to the sport (just running for about a year), I feel uneasy in following a three-week program for the marathon. I am planning to run the NYC marathon in November and haven't yet decided on a training program, however from what I've read one needs at least 25 mpw base to start speed training, which many of the three-week programs don't require. Although ideally, it would be great to just run 3 times a week, I think an unexperienced marathoner (first timer) should start with a five-six days per week training program that incorporates speedwork, tempo, and long runs.

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Manuel Tomas
Member
posted Jul-08-2006 11:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Manuel Tomas   Click Here to Email Manuel Tomas     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by kevinm:
Run a qualifying marathon - training only 3 days a week!

No it's not a late night info-mercial for the latest fitness program. Nor have I sunk to the depths of yellow journalism. There's actually some truth to this one. We did it and you can too.

I'm going to pass one my personal experience with the 'train 3 days a week' program. My running buddy, (we'll refer to him as 'Ted'), and I both used a 3-day a week program this fall to qualify. I'll attempt to give a practitioner's rendition of the pros and cons of it. I'll talk about what we would do differently and how effective it was.

As always, this is free advice and worth every penny! Be warned that neither of us followed the proscribed plan religiously. We changed it to suit ourselves, but I think there are some inferences that while not scientifically rigorous are still valid.

This is an extract of a recent article written by Chris Russell.

The rest of the article can be seen at: http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/6/6_1/tabloid-training.shtml

If you have any opinion about the article we invite you to post it here.


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Manuel Tomas
Member
posted Jul-08-2006 11:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Manuel Tomas   Click Here to Email Manuel Tomas     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Hi everyone

I am pretty scared of injuries. i guess like everyone... To me, It has kept me away from running for six years. My knees and a few other pressures...

Anyway, recently, I felt the need to get back into shape, and of course, my running days are some of my most precious memories... So i decided to check if my knees could take a bit of bashing.

From all the research I did, your trainning seems the most appropiate for my condition. No need for six hours trainning and hitting the road for long hours...

I am on my first week trainning and so far, so good. But I guess it is still a bit early to make any remarkable comment.
However, I have to mention that I am about five kilos my perfect weight. Fat level on my body are way to high, and stick to the first week trainning has not being difficult but no easy.... ( I know, pretty sad...)

Since I donīt like running with partners, lonely ranger, to maintain myself motivated, if nobody has any complaint about it, I will be reporting weekly or forthnightly the results on this trainning schedule.

I am trainning in Mojacar, Spain. Very down South of Spain, near the only european desert, check Tabernas desert.

So in a normal summer day like today, the temperatures could get up to 44 celsius / 112 Fahrenheit.

Usually running very late afternoon or before sunrise.

Tips more than welcome.
Manuel Tomas


quote:
Originally posted by kevinm:
Run a qualifying marathon - training only 3 days a week!

No it's not a late night info-mercial for the latest fitness program. Nor have I sunk to the depths of yellow journalism. There's actually some truth to this one. We did it and you can too.

I'm going to pass one my personal experience with the 'train 3 days a week' program. My running buddy, (we'll refer to him as 'Ted'), and I both used a 3-day a week program this fall to qualify. I'll attempt to give a practitioner's rendition of the pros and cons of it. I'll talk about what we would do differently and how effective it was.

As always, this is free advice and worth every penny! Be warned that neither of us followed the proscribed plan religiously. We changed it to suit ourselves, but I think there are some inferences that while not scientifically rigorous are still valid.

This is an extract of a recent article written by Chris Russell.

The rest of the article can be seen at: http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/6/6_1/tabloid-training.shtml

If you have any opinion about the article we invite you to post it here.


------------------

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cyktrussell
Cool Runner
posted Jul-26-2006 08:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cyktrussell   Click Here to Email cyktrussell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sorry, I hadn't really been paying attention to the forums.
I think the Furman program is pretty good for those of us who want to compete at a reasonable level wihtout beating ourselves up too much.
As always - free advice is worth every penny - everyone needs to experiment - keep what works and chuck what doesn't. That's how life is!
Running is a personal thing and you have to figure out what works for you.
I'm going to use FIRST this summer/fall again too.
Some of the questions still unanswered in my head are:
- What's the best type/intensity cross training?
I did swimming last year, I was afraid to put biking or any other leg work in for fear of overlap. I think this year I'm going to cycle Biking, swimming and lifting every other day.
- What is the intensity/tactical rules of the speedwork?
Do I let my heart rate come all the way down between reps? Jog? Walk?
As usual I'm mostly winging it!
Anyone wants to do some 8:15 long runs in Mass, give me a call!
C-,

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92heelgrad
Cool Runner
posted Jul-31-2006 01:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 92heelgrad   Click Here to Email 92heelgrad     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I did this plan last year for the Chicago Marathon, and PR'd by over 3minutes (3:40). However I was on pace to hit 3:30 until mile 20 or so when I started cramping up. I did the Intermediate plan (FIRST to Finish), and for the most part I followed it, but I did not do the cross-training part and I may have paid the price at the end. I had no injury problems for the first time, so a great experience. Also improved my 5K time PR from 20:17 to 19:25!

My opinion is that some good base work with slower longer runs may help before starting this. Also be aware you WILL be running indoors as there is no way to run this fast when it is 90 degrees outside. It is not an easy program, but it is very effective at getting you ready injury free.

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